Two for Tuesday: Postseason Flashbacks and the Tigers’ Moonlight Graham

Number2.jpgI sure didn’t like living in Texas for the three years I was there, but I’m a big Rangers fan for the next week or so.

Sorry, Grandy.

Hey, speaking of the postseason, here are a couple of Tigers October memories, courtesy of the fabulous Baseball-Reference.com:

  • On this date in 1984, Padres pitchers tie a World Series record by issuing 11 walks in a 5-2 loss to the Tigers in Game Three. Marty Castillo hit a two-run homer in the second — and Mike McClary was there. The Tigers took a 2-1 Series lead.

  • And, in 1987, the Twins beat the Tigers 9-5 in Game Five of the ALCS to wrap up its first American League title since 1965. Twins third baseman Gary Gaetti is named MVP. And I’m still bitter.

Finally, Happy 83rd Birthday to Doc Daugherty. He played in only one game for the Tigers — his only in the majors: April 22, 1951. He batted one time, pinch-hitting for Virgil Trucks in the top of the ninth in a 3-2 loss to the White Sox in Chicago. He struck out against the Sox’s Billy Pierce.

Tigers Today: August 26, 2010

CandianFlag.jpgTigers’ Record:

63-64, 3rd Place; 9 GB

Today’s Game

Tigers @ Blue Jays | 7:07 p.m. ET – Rogers Centre | On the air: FSD/AM 1270 and 97.1 FM

Pitching Matchup

Max Scherzer (9-9, 3.73 ERA) vs. Ricky Romero (10-7, 3.50 ERA)

Yesterday’s Results

Royals 4 – Tigers 3 (12 innings)

Continue reading “Tigers Today: August 26, 2010”

On This Date in 1986…

…the Tigers acquired catcher Dave Engle to the Twins for the one-time Lou-Whitaker-displacing Chris Pittaro and Alejandro Sanchez.

If I remember correctly, the Tigers viewed Engle as insurance for Lance Parrish but he played only three games at catcher, 23 at first and a smattering of games in the outfield. In 86 at bats he hit .256 and was released on Aug. 10, 1986.

While we’re at it:

Happy Birthday to former Tigers catcher/third baseman/World Series overachiever Marty Castillo, who turns 52.

Talking with Johnny Grubb, Part II

JohnnyGrubb2.jpgThis is the second and final installment of my conversation with former Tigers outfielder and pinch-hitter extraordinaire, Johnny Grubb. You can find the first installment here.


Mike McClary: Heading into the 1984 season, was it a long off-season? It would seem like you would be chomping at the bit to get back on the field shortly after a little break. Was everyone coming into spring training raring to go?

Johnny Grubb: Yeah, I think so. I remember us getting Dave Bergman and Willie [Hernandez]. So they came over, and they fit right in with the team, too. I mean, we just had a good group of guys that got along, and Dave Bergman is a heck of a guy and so was Willie. So it worked out great.

MMc: Let’s talk about the ’84 season in general. Obviously, you got off to a great start, 9-0, and in the middle of that, Jack Morris throws a no-hitter. As you were getting older and becoming the seasoned veteran, were you really just enjoying about every moment of that season?

JG: Oh, gosh, yeah. It was fun to watch those guys play and every once in a while to jump in and do something myself. But it was a lot of fun watching Gibby and Alan Trammell and Lou Whitaker and Darrell [Evans] — and Lance did a great job. And Howard Johnson had the great season for us. I thought he did a great job. And Larry Herndon and all those guys really did well in the pitching.

So really what I remember most about it is that I never really felt like we were out of any ballgame. Any lead a team could get, we felt like we could have a big inning and jump right back in the game. And we had real good pitching, so if we had the lead, we had Willie and [Aurelio] Lopez coming in to shut the door on them. The pitchers did their job, and the hitters did their job. And we just felt like we could win any game.

That 35-5 start really helped a lot, too. But I think that pretty much was an indicator of how strong we were because that’s pretty phenomenal when you think about a 35-5 start in the major leagues. That’s pretty good.

Continue reading “Talking with Johnny Grubb, Part II”